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UNI Calendar of Events

Exhibits, Films and Lectures Calendar

Wednesday, October 24, 2018 - 7:00 pm

Monarch butterfly populations have been declining over the last 20 years. Because insect numbers are notoriously difficult to assess, and because they often show large annual fluctuations, simply documenting this decline has been a challenge. It is now important to move beyond simple documentation, and toward responding to the challenge posed by monarch conservation, and insect conservation in general. Karen Oberhauser will describe the amazing biology of migratory monarch populations, how citizens and scientists are documenting monarch numbers across their migratory cycle, and then discuss what all of us can do to help preserve this charismatic insect for generations to come. Her visit is a part of UNI's 2018/2019 Aldo Leopold Distinguished Lecture Series.

Thursday, October 25, 2018 - 12:30 pm

Join Rod Library for a film viewing of "Paywall: The Business of Scholarship" and discussion.

Thursday, October 25, 2018 - 6:30 pm

Letha Wilson is known for combining photography with industrial materials like concrete and steel. Wilson cuts, tears and shapes her photographs, pushing and pulling the prints into place and then encases portions of the composition in cement. She explores the magnetic pull of the American West, alluding to landscape’s intrinsic role in our own myths of reinvention, endless possibility, and inevitable promise. Using architecture and three-dimensionality as both frame and armature, Wilson reclaims the photographic image, exploring the medium’s inability to encompass the site it represents.

Letha Wilson (1976 Honolulu, US) lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. She earned her BFA from Syracuse University, and a MFA from Hunter College. Residencies include Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Yaddo, Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Headlands Center for the Arts. Wilson has exhibited at the MASS Moca, Essl Museum, Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, Bronx Museum of the Arts, Socrates Sculpture Park, Exit Art, ARKO Art Center and the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art.

Thursday, October 25, 2018 - 7:00 pm
Thursday, October 25, 2018 - 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm

Gayle Rhineberger-Dunn will discuss how the media play an important role in constructing social reality, shaping our beliefs about crime and justice and influencing criminal justice policy.This presentation focuses on the depictions of race, gender, crime and (in)justices presented in prime-time crime fictional television programs, news media and other popular culture outlets, and the significant consequences of these inaccurate media portrayals.

Thursday, October 25, 2018 - 9:00 pm to 10:00 pm

View the night sky through the computer controlled telescope at the Earth and Environmental Science Observatory. This event is free and open to the public; meet before 9 p.m. to get to the observatory (near the polar bear). No late admissions will be allowed; no food or drink and no cellphones or other electronic devices can be used during the observatory visit.

Friday, October 26, 2018 - 7:00 pm to 10:00 pm

Join us for the final week of our October Month of Horror celebration. We will be watching George Romero's 1968 classic zombie horror "Night of the Living Dead." Refreshments will be provided.

Saturday, October 27, 2018 - 1:30 pm to 4:30 pm

Join us for our final horror screening of the month. We will begin with the original 1925 "The Phantom of the Opera," followed by the Danish 1932 horror "Vampyr" by Carl Th. Dreyer.

Monday, October 29, 2018 - 7:00 pm

"Deej" is a Peabody Award-winning documentary about autism and inclusion, directed by Robert Rooy, produced by Robert Rooy and DJ “Deej” Savarese. This event is presented in tandem with a lecture by Ralph Savarese, author of See it Feelingly: Classic Novels, Autistic Readers, and the Schooling of a No-Good English Professor (Duke University Press). That lecture takes place at 7p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 30, in 1017 Bartlett Hall.

Tuesday, October 30, 2018 - 7:00 pm

Ralph Savarese, Grinnell College, is the author of the new book See it Feelingly: Classic Novels, Autistic Readers, and the Schooling of a No-Good English Professor (Duke University Press). Edward Hirsch says of See it Feelingly, "This deft and impassioned hybrid—part memoir, part disability study, part portraiture, part literary criticism—is a book of revelations about reading, neurodiversity, and American literature." This event is held in tandem with a screening of Deej,a Peabody-award winning documentary about autism and inclusion, directed by Robert Rooy, produced by Robert Rooy and DJ “Deej” Savarese. That event is at 7 p.m., Monday, Oct. 29, in 002 Sabin.

Tuesday, October 30, 2018 - 7:00 pm

Steen Metz was only eight years old when he, along with his father and mother, was arrested on October 2, 1943 at their home in Odense, Denmark and deported to the Theresienstadt concentration camp. His illustrated presentation will be followed by a question-and-answer session.

This presentation is part of a series of events organized and sponsored by the Hearst Center for the Arts and the UNI Center for Holocaust and Genocide Education to commemorate the seventy-fifth anniversary of the Fall 1943 rescue of the Jews of Denmark.

This event is free and open to the public. 

Thursday, November 1, 2018 - 4:00 pm

Gregory Friestad, University of Iowa, will present "New Tools for Selectivity in Carbon-Carbon Bond Construction:  Radical, Polar and Radical-Polar Crossover Reactions."

Thursday, November 1, 2018 - 7:00 pm

In this 90-minute drama, a Danish family hides their Jewish neighbors and helps them escape the roundup of the Jews of Denmark by the Nazi occupiers in the fall of 1943. The cast includes Sam Waterston and Mia Farrow.

This screening is the second in a three-part film series organized by the UNI Center for Holocaust and Genocide Education and the Hearst Center for the Arts in conjunction with the exhibit "Rescue + Resistance: Photographs by Judy Ellis Glickman.  

Thursday, November 1, 2018 - 9:00 pm to 10:00 pm

View the night sky through the computer controlled telescope at the Earth and Environmental Science Observatory. This event is free and open to the public; meet before 9 p.m. to get to the observatory (near the polar bear). No late admissions will be allowed; no food or drink and no cellphones or other electronic devices can be used during the observatory visit.

Monday, November 5, 2018 - 12:00 pm

The Current Research on Women and Gender (CROW) Forum features Kyrie Borsay presenting "Implicit Bias: Unconscious Associations Influenced By Experience."

Tuesday, November 6, 2018 - 7:00 pm

In 1940, there were nearly 1900 daily newspapers in the United States read and shared by millions of Americans. These periodicals give us a glimpse into the intense struggles in the American heartland over arguments promoting racism, discrimination, antisemitism, and isolationism during the 1930s and 1940s. What role did antisemitism play in the general American cultural landscape? How did ordinary Americans in the Midwest and the rest of the country react to antisemitic rhetoric by political and religious leaders?

This talk addresses the landscape of the United States from the end of World War I to 1941, identifying the historical and social context in which Americans lived. It will also examine the role media played in what Americans knew about the world around them. It concentrates on three influential American leaders, Henry Ford, Father Charles Coughlin, and Charles Lindbergh, who were all involved with the America First Committee and who all spread antisemitic vitriol to millions of supporters. The talk concludes with generalizations from this period and lessons for the post-war era.

Eric Schmalz is the community manager for the History Unfolded project at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, DC.  This program is made possible by the Campus Outreach Lecture Program of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum's Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, supported by the Leonard and Sofie Davis Fund.

Monday, November 12, 2018 - 6:00 pm

Dennis Ichiyama, Professor of Visual Communication Design at Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, will present a lecture in association with the UNI Gallery of Art presentation "The Reach and Richness of Design: The Elena Diane Curris Biennial Design Exhibition," which was curated by Professor Roy R. Behrens.

Wednesday, November 14, 2018 - 7:00 pm

Kenneth Lyftogt, history, will present "Iowa: Free Child of the Missouri Compromise." The event is free and open to the public.

Thursday, November 15, 2018 - 6:30 pm

Brice D. Smith, author of “Lou Sullivan: Daring to be a Man Among Men,” will present an address. Smith’s book was chosen the Fall 2018 President’s Diversity Common Read at the University of Northern Iowa, and is a biography what may have been the first transgender man to publicly identify as gay. Sullivan also was an activist for trans men from the 1960s to the 1980s and contributed to our modern understanding of sexuality, sexual orientation and gender identity. “Lou Sullivan: Daring to be a Man Among Men” was a 2018 Lambda Literary Award finalist and is currently being adapted for a feature film. Copies of the book will be available for purchase at Smith’s address.

Smith coordinated the Milwaukee Transgender Oral History Project.

He and his wife life in Milwaukee. He holds a Ph.D. in history from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Thursday, November 15, 2018 - 7:00 pm

This 94-minute drama (in Danish, with English subtitles) is the most recent film to tell the story of the rescue of the Jews of Denmark by their Danish countrymen, who helped them escape to Sweden and avoid deportation by the Nazi occupiers in October 1943.  

This film creening is the last in a three-part series organized by the UNI Center for Holocaust and Genocide Education and the Hearst Center for the Arts in conjunction with the exhibit "Rescue + Resistance: Photographys by Judy Ellis Glickman," to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the rescue of the Jews of Denmark in the fall of 1943.

This event is free and open to the public. "Across the Waters" will also be screened (free and open to the public) at 10 a.m. on Nov. 15 at the Hearst Center for the Arts.

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